Group Policies to Enable Device Guard and Credential Guard

There are a bunch of group policies that are going to be necessary to enable credential guard and device guard in an Active Directory Domain environment. For the domain controllers, you are going to want to enable the following policies:

DOMAIN CONTROLLERS: AdministrativeTemplates/ComputerConfiguration/System/KDC : The necessary settings include >
KDC support for claims, compound authentication and Kerberos armoring: (This needs to be enabled on all domain controllers in order for Credential Guard to work.)

Also, Request Compound Authentication is necessary for Credential Guard so that as devices authenticate with the Domain Controllers, Kerberos compound authentication is requested. Enable this policy as well.

Next we need to go to the following location in the GPMC.msc (Group Policy Management Console) or GPEDIT.msc ( Group Policy Editor for local policies only):
AdministrativeTemplates/ComputerConfiguration/System/DeviceGuard: Turn on Virtualization Based Security -Enabled, for the options on the bottom, the best choices for testing are:
Select Platform Level: SECURE BOOT
VirtualizationBasesSecurityCodeIntegrity:Enabled without Lock
CredentialGuardConfiguration: Enabled without Lock
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Now on a policy that is applied to the domain computers,servers, and devices that are compatible with credential guard, you will enable the following policies:

AdministrativeTemplates/ComputerConfiguration/System/Kerberos
1. Always send compound authentication first: Enabled
2. Kerberos client support for claims, compound authentication and Kerberos armoring: Enabled
3. Support compound authentication: Enabled – Support authorization with client device information:Automatic

After enabling these policies, you should be on your way to supporting Credential Guard, once you figure out how to use Code Integrity Policies, and enable the policy Deploy Code Integrity Policy (ComputerConfiguration/AdministrativeTemplates/System/DeviceGuard) then you can deploy Device Guard, however this policy is not necessary to use Device Guard. (There are some registry settings that can be set and then you can create code integrity policies and move them to C:\Windows\system32\CodeIntegrity to enable Device Guard.

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Microsoft also offers a tool called the Device Guard and Credential Guard Readiness Tool which includes a PowerShell script to help enable Credential Guard, Device Guard, and Hypervisor Code Integrity.